Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Healthcare & Hospital Management Vienna, Austria.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Daniel Vukelich

Association of Medical Device Reprocessors, USA

Keynote: Single-use device reprocessing: Paving the way for increased patient safety, lower costs and reduced medical waste

Time : 09:30-10:10

Hospital Management 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Daniel Vukelich photo
Biography:

Daniel J Vukelich is the President of the Association of Medical Device Reprocessors (AMDR), the global trade associating representing the legal, regulatory and other trade interests of the commercial medical device reprocessing industry. AMDR’s core mission is to promote the proper reprocessing and re-manufacturing (cleaning, repair/refurbishing, testing, sterilization, among other steps) of “single use” devices (SUDs). He also represents the industry before the European Union, Canada, Japan and other international bodies

Abstract:

Globally, hospital reuse of “single-use” devices, or SUDs, has the potential to adversely impact patient safety. However, international regulatory authorities are coming to regulate SUD reprocessing as a manufacturing activity, which has resulted in evidence supporting patient safety, lower device costs and waste reduction creating a win-win for hospitals and health care systems. Commercial SUD reprocessing is an established best practice in the U.S., Canada and Germany, with emerging stages of regulation happening in Japan, South Africa and all of Central and Latin America. The new comprehensive European Medical Device Regulation (MDR) set to be adopted in June of 2017 is taking SUD reprocessing to a new level there. The MDR will regulate the reuse of SUDs as a manufacturing activity and thus such reuse, whether it takes place in hospitals or commercial entities, is subject to EU manufacturer requirements, including CE marking requirements. The regulation of SUD reuse is an important first step toward stopping unregulated SUD reuse in hospitals. Moreover, regulation will provide an overt, legal and safe pathway for hospitals to acquire lower-cost and environmentally preferable reprocessed devices. The result will be increased patient safety, more competition, and lower costs and reduced medical waste for hospitals. This session will provide an overview of the literature and data supporting the safety of regulated SUD reuse, but will also briefly address a 2016 study addressing device failure rates (new versus reprocessed). This session will address the differences between hospital reprocessing and commercial reprocessors meeting medical device manufacturer requirements, and provide insight into the implications of the new requirements for hospitals. This session will also provide an overview of the economic and environmental implications for healthcare markets where SUD reprocessing has been regulated, evaluating safety, cost saving and environmental factors.

Hospital Management 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Orla Healy photo
Biography:

Orla Healy was trained and worked in hospital medicine for five years before embarking a career in Public Health Medicine following appointment as a Consultant in Public Health Medicine in 2005. She worked in national and regional capacity in the areas of Health Service Improvement, Patient Safety and Acute Hospital Policy Development. She is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, UCC. Her activity there includes Undergraduate and Post Graduate lectures, PhD supervision and collaborative applied public research with UCC on behalf of the health services. In May 2016, she was appointed as Director of Quality, Governance and Patient Safety to the newly established South/South West Hospital Group (SSWHG) and in February 2017, she was appointed as Director of Strategy, Planning and Population Health in the SSWHG. Her research interests include Health Policy Analysis, Health System Re-design & Evaluation and Population Health.

Abstract:

Healthcare policy is contentious and rarely off the socio-political agenda. An acute hospital reconfiguration policy was put in place in Ireland in 2006. Implementation varies by region and has occurred in the absence of either a clear methodology with which to plan or judge service changes. The aim of this research was to assess implementation of reconfiguration in three areas and account for observed variation. A multiple case study design involving three regions was undertaken. Three geographically contiguous hospital networks were selected. Documentary analysis of policy documents was performed and a historical chronology was produced. System-level indicators of reconfiguration (activity data) were quantitatively analysed to provide objective evidence of policy implementation and to explore changes that could be attributed to reconfiguration, or extraneous factors. Each network faced challenges to the sustainability of its acute hospitals, yet each had taken different and distinctive approaches to reconfiguration. One region, the Mid-West has fully reconfigured services. The process was complex and unstable. The process was rushed because of regulatory pressure following the publication of a patient safety investigation. Reconfiguration was almost complete in the South. The process was stable, albeit slow. Plans to reconfigure services in the South-East were abandoned. Reconfigured regions showed differentiation of services and specialty development. All regions implemented nationally mandated reconfiguration of cancer services. Reconfiguration was not a determinant of regional self-sufficiency in the delivery of care. Reconfiguration of acute hospitals is a function of the historical and socio-political context. The delivery of high quality sustainable acute hospital services is dependent on strategic configuration of hospital services. At regional level this translates to the requirement for evidence-based, well-articulated plans that are consistent with national policy but tailored to local context and sustained commitment to implementation by distributed clinical leadership supported by coherent national policy.

Keynote Forum

Tony Macknight

ADInstruments Pty Ltd, New Zealand

Keynote: Designing effective E-learning material

Time : 10:50-11:30

Hospital Management 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tony Macknight photo
Biography:

A D C (Tony) Macknight graduated MBChB from the University of Otago Medical School in 1963. After a year as a House Surgeon working for the Auckland Hospital Board, he returned to the University of Otago Department of Physiology where he completed a PhD in 1968 and an MD in 1969 studying aspects of cell volume regulation under the supervision of Professor James Robinson. He then spent two years doing postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School in the laboratory of Professor Alexander Leaf working on epithelial transport. He returned to a position as Lecturer in Physiology at the University of Otago in 1971. In 1981 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand and in 1984 he was appointed as the Wolf Harris Professor of Physiology at the University of Otago, a position he held until his retirement from full-time academic work at the beginning of 2002. He continued his research until 2007, his research group in Otago collaborating with the group headed by Professor Mortimer Civan at the University of Pennsylvania in a study of the transport pathways involved in the production of the aqueous humour. In addition to his research interests, he played a major role in the introduction in 1987 of problem-based, case- oriented learning in physiology for medical students at the University of Otago. During the 1990s he was a key member of the Curriculum Development group that designed and implemented a new, systems-based, case-related two year preclinical medical course. He also initiated the development of the computer-based data acquisition system for use in biomedical teaching and research that is now marketed internationally by ADInstruments as the PowerLab system and is used in universities, research institutes and industry throughout the world. Professor Macknight was the chairman of the Organising Committee for the 34th International Congress of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) that was held in Christchurch, NZ in 2001 as well as the Chairman of the International Scientific Program Committee for that Congress. He was a member of the Council of the IUPS from 2001 to 2009. Presently he acts Director of Education for ADInstruments, is a member of the IUPS Education Committee, and continues to serve on Grant Reviewing Committees of the Health Research Council of NZ

Abstract:

E-learning has become ‘fashionable’ and the internet hosts an increasing number of modules and courses from simple lessons to MOOCS. But how best to design these? We now understand better than ever before how people actually learn and we should design our materials to enhance that learning. We learn by taking information from the environment through our sensory inputs into our working memory. Our working memory is very limited and we must not overload it. We need to process the information there, rehearse it and link it to knowlege we already have in long-term memory. There are four fundamental steps that facilitate learning: First, the learner must focus on key graphics and words – both are necessary to enhance learning. Second, the learner must rehearse this information in working memory to organize it and integrate it with existing knowledge in long-term memory. Third, in order to do this integration, the limited working memory that we all have, must not be overloaded. Fourth, new knowledge stored in long-term memory must be able to be retrieved when needed in the future and so must be learnt in context. With this template in mind, I shall take, as an example, a simple lesson and analyse how the material in this is best presented to maximise student learning.

  • Health Care and Hospital Management | Hospital Management and Clinical Pharmacy | Hospitals Services and Management | HealthCare Economics and Policy
Location: meeting 9
Speaker

Chair

Tony Macknight

ADInstruments Pty Ltd, New Zealand

Speaker

Co-Chair

Daniel Vukelich

Association of Medical Device Reprocessors, USA

Session Introduction

Linda Paradiso

Old Dominion University, USA

Title: Just Culture, Trust, and the Impact to Patient Safety
Speaker
Biography:

Linda Paradiso was a Dominion University DNP student. She has more than thirty years of experience as a nurse, the last twenty at the director of service level. She is board certified as a Nurse Executive, Advanced by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. In January, 2015, she completed The Just Culture Certification Course for Healthcare. She has an intimate understanding of the importance of designing reliable systems and the critical need to support good behavioral choices made by staff. She has successfully utilized the Just Culture algorithm to analyze many critical incidents. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing

Abstract:

Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States, and nurses can have a significant impact in reducing those deaths. Hospitals are imperfect systems where nurses have competing demands, and are forced to improvise, and develop work-around. This autonomy creates illusions that systems are effective. Errors rarely occur in a vacuum, but are a sequence of events with multiple opportunities to correct the error. Nurses possess the unique ability to identify errors due to their proximity to the patient. The primary barrier to reporting errors is the negative response and risk of discipline. In an environment of trust a safe haven can be developed that supports speaking out. Just Culture is an environment where organizations are accountable for the systems they design, fostering analysis of the incident, not the individual. Organizations must strive to understand the nature and scope of errors actively redesign faulty systems, and value voluntary error reporting. Organizations often determine response to an error by its severity. In a Just Culture all errors hold equal importance. Nurses must receive fair treatment when reporting safety near misses and incidents. If nurses perceive their treatment is not just, they may drive valuable safety-related information underground. The adoption of Just Culture principles is most effective when embraced by all members of the organization. An anonymous survey was conducted in a large, urban teaching hospital to determine the relationship of trust and Just Culture. The findings offer practical implications to developing a trusting and Just Culture, and a balanced approach to incident investigation. When behaviors and attitudes are aligned, then the approach to performance improvement becomes the standard work of all staff. Leaders need to be aware of the perception of trust in the organization to foster Just Culture principles and move to becoming a reliable organization.

Speaker
Biography:

Livia Montes Santos has a background in Social Work. She completed her Post Graduate in Social Work at Universidade de São Paulo and also completed the executive course in innovation in healthcare at INSEAD (France). She has also completed an MBA in Healthcare Management in 2014. Currently, she is concluding an MSc in Innovation in Healthcare. Her activities includes: strategic planning, leadership, management in healthcare and project management

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In the 1980´s, with the reduction of investments in public health in Brazil, and the bad conditions of health services, there was a migration of sectors to private plans. In this context, Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HCFMUSP), through the support of two Foundations, began to provide supplementary care for patients with healthcare insurance. In 2013, an Administrative Coordination was created to work in a multidisciplinary and multisectoral way, to establish and align guidelines and projects for health care providers and patients. To define the scope of the services, some strategies were developed following these aspects: standardize, in an integrated way, the management practice of the Units (7 Units), to measure the outcomes, optimize the processes, and offer quality for the patient.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Quantitative analysis of all data collected from the financial and assistance information system.

Findings: In this project, which covered the review of all patients guiding processes, we found many gaps related to the financial area, care assistance, marketing and administrative perspectives.

Conclusion & Significance: Even with the political and economical crises in Brazil, since 2015, the Hospital made a positive improvement in the operational efficiency, increasing 26% (US$12,8millions) in the financial outcomes. With the implementation of some projects to solve these problems, and an evaluation and measurement of outcomes, it was possible to achieve the goals and guarantee a better financial performance

Speaker
Biography:

Sujata Malik is a seasoned Hospital Management professional with extensive first-hand experience of managing operations of large hospitals in India. She is heading a Healthcare Management Consulting Company. She is a Member of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). Healthcare Quality, is another area of specialisation. She is a Principal Assessor with National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH), which is the healthcare accreditation agency in India. Her study is based on implementation of extensive restructuring of pharmacy processes, in a 350 bedded multi-speciality hospital in Pune in Western India. Her evaluation of the problem, implementation of corrective strategies and monitoring of impact, reflects her in depth understanding of the subject. It is felt that the study will be of relevance to healthcare management professionals in other parts of the world as well. Currently, she is the CEO and Managing Director at Sunburst Healthcare Pvt Ltd., India

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: Pharmacy services are an important contributor to the business of any multi-speciality, tertiary care hospital. Their mandate is to meet complex and diverse requirements, such as pharmaceutical products, implantable devices, prostheses and medical consumables. It is important therefore to align business objectives to essential quality requirements. The aim is to ensure an uninterrupted supply chain at all times, while complying with quality and regulatory requirements. The basic principles of vendor selection, inventory control, Just-in-time delivery, are a major contributor to service excellence and profitability.  This case study presents the impact that a complete re-working of processes, had on the functioning of a pharmacy providing OPD and in-patient services to a 350 bedded multi-speciality hospital in India.

Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: The impact of a series of interventions, like institution of a Pharmaco-Therapeutic Committee, adoption of a formulary, limitation of brands, a well-defined vendor selection process, was studied. Questionnaires were used to obtain feed-back from vendors and users of the service, including doctors and nurses. Quality metrics were measured and compared to the previous year. Inventory held, credits obtained due to back-loading of stock before expiry, and financial performance, were measured.

Findings: Well planned, multi-pronged interventions w.r.t pharmacy services, led to significant improvement in service quality, customer satisfaction and profitability of the business.

Conclusion and Significance: Process re-engineering of pharmacy services can significantly impact the financial well-being of a hospital. Improvement in quality of service and customer and vendor satisfaction are other benefits. Recommendations are made for hospital pharmacies to initiate and sustain process restructuring for improvement in quality and financial performance of hospital pharmacy services.

Sylwia Nieszporska

Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland

Title: The common pool resources theory and health system management
Speaker
Biography:

Sylwia Nieszporska has been PhD in economics since 2006. She was an expert and member of a group preparing the report “Health Care Financing in Poland”for Ministry of Health. Now, she holds the position as the member of Statistics and Econometrics Department. Currently, she is employed at the Czestochowa University of Technology as a Faculty of Management.

Abstract:

The political and economic past of the Middle-East Europe in the last few decades has taken toll on many sectors of Polish economy including the health system. It has been the subject of many transformations but it is still far from ideal. This opinion has been confirmed by statistical researches and opinions of many experts, which implies problems in managing and organizing the system. Therefore, the search for new methods of management and new structural solutions seems to be a priority. There are a few concepts how to heal the Polish health care system. Among them, there is quite a new idea of creating cooperatives, which unite patients, and medical staff, that was introduced in many countries in the world. This proposition decentralizes health care system and makes management easier and more efficient. This paper aims to describe the conception of cooperatives and to present its possible benefits for the Polish health care system. The substantiation of the introduction of cooperatives to the health care system is on one hand the theory of common pool resources, and on the other hand their effective functioning in contemporary world and satisfying health needs of a society

  • Medical Education and Research | Medical Education and Practice | Medical Education and Health Education | Medical Education and e-Learning | Medical Education and Future | Nursing Education and Community Health Nursing
Location: meeting 9
Speaker

Chair

Tony Macknight

ADInstruments Pty Ltd, New Zealand

Speaker

Co-Chair

Daniel Vukelich

Association of Medical Device Reprocessors, USA

Session Introduction

Bum Ju Lee

Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, South Korea

Title: The relationship of nutritional component and peptic ulcer disease
Speaker
Biography:

Bum Ju Lee has his expertise in evaluation in association between anthropometric indices and metabolic abnormalities. He studied the relationship between anthropometric indices related to obesity and hypertension, hypotension, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, and serum high- and low-density lipoproteins, and has published many articles with these contents. He is currently a Senior Researcher in the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. His research interests include data mining and database, bioinformatics, public health, epidemiology, and oriental medicine.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Peptic ulcer disease is a common disease worldwide and has been a significant effect on morbidity and mortality over the past two centuries. Peptic ulcer disease was categorized into duodenal ulcer, gastric and stomach ulcer, and unspecified peptic ulcer. Until now, several studies have reported that the intake of nutritional components is associated with peptic ulcer disease. However, the association of peptic ulcer disease with nutrition components remains to be fully understood.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the association of nutritional components with peptic ulcer disease in Korean population.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A total of 6,323 subjects (2,808 men and 3,515 women) were participated in this study. We obtained the data from the First Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES I). In the crude analysis and the analyses adjusted for gender and age, binary logistic regression was performed to identify association between the peptic ulcer patients and the normal subjects.

Findings: In nutritional components, fiber was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease (p = 0.0003, OR = 1.19 [1.082-1.31]), and this association remained significant after adjusting for age and gender (adjusted p = 0.033, adjusted OR = 1.108 [1.008-1.218]). In both crude and adjusted analyses, peptic ulcer disease was related to calcium (adjusted p = 0.039, adjusted OR = 1.117 [1.006-1.240]) and sodium (adjusted p = 0.013, adjusted OR = 1.134 [1.027-1.253]). Although vitamins (A, B2, and C), carotene, and niacin were associated with peptic ulcer disease, these associations disappeared after adjusting for gender and age.

Conclusion & Significance: Fiber, calcium, and sodium were significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease in Korea, regardless of gender and age.

Speaker
Biography:

Ji Ho So has his expertise in evaluation and passion in improving the Medical Engineering and software Engineering. His open and contextual evaluation model based on responsive constructivists creates new pathways for improving healthcare. He has built this model after years of experience in research, evaluation and administration both in research and laboratory

Abstract:

In Korean medicine Sasang constitutional medicine categorizes people into four types according to individual characteristics: Tae-Yang (TY), Tae-Eum (TE), So-Yang (SY), and So-Eum (SE) types. The reason for categorizing the constitution is that each constitution has a different approach to treating diseases. Drugs and treatments are applied differently depending on the constitution, even if they have the same disease. For this reason, it is very important to objectively diagnose Sasang constitution. SCAT (Sasang Constitutional Analysis Tool) is a system that provides the information necessary for an expert to diagnose Sasang Constitution objectively. Four kinds of information are needed to diagnose Sasang constitution using SCAT. First, you need a picture of the faces of the front and left sides. Second, you need an audio file with a specific sentence recorded. Third, the circumference length of eight important parts of the body is required. Finally, a questionnaire for each type of personality, diet, digestion, and metabolism is needed. Four types of information such as face, voice, body type, and questionnaire are uploaded to the SCAT system through the website to diagnose the Sasang constitution. Using the SCAT, you can obtain objective analysis of facial, voice, body, and questionnaires. The oriental doctor can diagnose more accurately and objectively by using the analyzed results. SCAT provides an environment that facilitates easy access to the diagnosis of Sasang constitution to experts and general users. SCAT is being used as a good learning and practical tool for students who are learning initially by providing objective information needed for the diagnosis of Sasang constitution. SCAT has a user-friendly UI / UX for user's ease of use. And it is made up of web service that is convenient to use regardless of place. Through the development of the SCAT system in the future, the convenience of use and the accuracy of information will be improved as a tool for diagnosing Sasang constitution.

Speaker
Biography:

Stenvert L S Drop is an Emeritus Professor Pediatric Endocrinology, Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. He has a longstanding experience as academic clinician with interest in Clinical Research. He is former Chief Editor of the ESPE-elearning.org program and has a longstanding interest in education and training.

Abstract:

We have developed a freely and globally accessible e-learning module within an e-learning website of the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) (www.espe-elearning.org) providing teaching and instruction material intended for first line health care workers in resource limited countries (RLC). The project grew following receiving feedback from a survey conducted by the Global Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Organisation (GPED) among various stakeholders within and outside RLC and reviewing literature stating that e-learning is effective taking policy-related issues on implementation, storage solutions, bandwidth, understanding of practicality and cost effectiveness into account. Thus, information provided should be in line with the clinical expertise and laboratory facilities generally available in the three levels of medical health care: primary (basic or rural); secondary (district and regional hospitals); tertiary (zonal or main/national referral hospitals). Importantly, the information should be easily accessible and provided in a locally spoken language. We have created an e-learning module based on this knowledge. Content, written in English, undergoes a review process by an international editorial board under the umbrella of the International Consortium of Pediatric Endocrinology (ICPE). The chapters (20-50 slides/chapter) cover the spectrum of paediatric endocrinology. Concise basic information on pathophysiology and guidelines for management are provided at the three health care levels, including criteria for referral to subsequent levels of care. Moreover, colleagues with RLC expertise are invited to contribute interactive vignettes illustrating challenging clinical cases (10-12 slides) complementing each chapter. Subsequently, all text is translated into Spanish, French, Swahili and Chinese by native speaking junior/senior colleagues. The translation is facilitated by translation tools with a translation memory database and a terminology approval management tool promoting consistency, accuracy and quality. The RLC module is applicable for self-study but additionally facilitates direct interaction between medical/nursing students and tutors in classroom teaching or in regional and (inter-) national e-learning courses

Speaker
Biography:

Deepak Doshi has immense interest in management and leadership. He has extensively published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at several international conferences including Africa, Europe, Asia and Australasia. He has worked as a leader in rural and urban areas. Rural and remote area leadership in rapidly growing rural areas is scantily studied. In this original research, he has discovered new traits and characteristics of rural and remote area leaders in Australia

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Leadership has been considered as a necessity among people, institutions, among other scholars and academicians in various multidisciplinary areas. Leadership has played a vital role in growth and development of the rural areas. Recruitment and retention of rural leaders have been major challenges identified in Australia. Leaders should have exceptional leadership traits. The study is focused on understanding the traits and characteristics of rural and remote area leaders in Australia. Moreover, several leadership traits were compared among rural and urban leaders as well as identifying new leadership traits.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Grounded Theory methodology was used contributing to qualitative research design. Convenience sampling was used to obtain a sample of 14 healthcare workers in South West Queensland rural and remote health facilities. Grounded theory process and thematic analysis were used for analysis of the data.

Findings: Results show that more than two thirds had experience in both rural and urban settings. Leadership traits identified were; self-confidence, openness, agreeable and consciousness. New traits were identified as resilience, emotional intelligence and adaptation. Leaders were considered to be role models in rural areas unlike urban areas.

Conclusion & Significance: Study concluded that leadership traits and characteristics are vital in rural settings. Rural and remote area leaders require learning newer traits and characteristics and modifying some existing skills to be successful in rural areas. This is the first study in the world about rural area leadership to the best of author’s knowledge. Further studies are recommended.

Amr Mohamed EL-Said Kamel

Ain Shams University, Egypt

Title: Sepsis & Septic shock
Speaker
Biography:

Amr Mohamed EL Said Kamel graduated from the School of Medicine, Ain Shams University in December 1984. He received Master Degree in Anesthesia & Intensive Care in November 1988 and Medical Doctorate Degree in Anesthesia & Intensive Care in April 1995. He is a Professor of Anesthesia & Intensive Care in Ain Shams University from 29th of August 2005. He is a Medical Director of the Intensive Care Unit of EL-Nozha International Hospital and Ain Shams University Specialized Hospital. He is Member of the Examination Boards for Master & Medical Doctorate Degrees in Anesthesiology & General Intensive Care in Ain Shams University

Abstract:

Sepsis is one of the oldest and most elusive syndromes in medicine. In 2001, an international consensus panel defined sepsis as a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Instead, the panel proposed the term “severe sepsis” to describe instances in which sepsis is complicated by acute organ dysfunction, and they codified “septic shock” as sepsis complicated by either hypotension that is refractory to fluid resuscitation or by hyperlactatemia. In the United States, severe sepsis is recorded in 2% of patients admitted to the hospital. Of these patients, half are treated in the intensive care unit (ICU), representing 10% of all ICU admissions. My presentation will be an interactive discussion for a case of septic shock admitted to our ICU and in this presentation, we will review:
1. Initial approach to the patient in septic shock
2. New therapies
3. Fluid resuscitation
4. Monitoring strategies
5. Sedation for delirium in the ICU
6. Nutrition in the acute phase of critical illness

Speaker
Biography:

Dorit Segal Engelchin is an Associate Professor. She is the Head of the Spitzer Department of Social Work and Co-director of the Center for Women’s Health Studies and Promotion, Ben- Gurion University of the Negev. Her research interests include diverse aspects of women's health and well-being, stress and coping, and evaluation of art-based interventions designed to reduce stress among people exposed to disasters

Orly Sarid completed her Bachelor of social work from Tel Aviv University and also done her Masters of social work from Tel Aviv University. Later she completed her Ph.D from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and belongs to the Department of Social work as a faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Earthquakes can lead to short and long-term psychological consequences, which negatively affect survivors' quality of life. To date, the clear majority of earthquake trauma related studies focus on people directly exposed to the event. The current study focused on an indirectly-exposed group.

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a single-session art-based intervention to reduce stress among Nepalese students, who were enrolled in a special program in Israel during the April 2015 Nepal earthquake.

Methodology: The intervention included drawing pictures that were later shared in small groups related to three topics: (1) emotions and thoughts related to the earthquake; (2) personal and collective resources that may help them cope with the earthquake outcomes upon their return to Nepal; and, (3) integration of the stressful image and the resource picture. To examine the intervention effect, the Subjective Units of Distress (SUDs) values of 116 Nepalese students were measured using a pre-post design.

Findings: The study results indicate that students' initial high distress levels significantly decreased on completion of the intervention.

Conclusion & Significance: The study results show the efficacy of an easily implemented art-based tool for stress reduction among individuals indirectly exposed to disaster conditions. Implications for future studies and for interventions designed for indirect victims of additional disasters will be discussed

Speaker
Biography:

Emad Nosair has built his 30-year expertise in education in both traditional and PBL programs. He has MSc in Leadership in Health Professionals Education, RCSI. His main interest was to provide medical students in SDL programs with comfortable educational environment for attaining the best quality of learning. Therefore, based on the outcomes of the current research, it was followed by another study for measuring student workload in such complex PBL settings to provide students with adequate time for deep learning and to avoid their overload which has negative impact on their academic progress as well as on their feedback to faculty and to the institution

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Students’ perception of their educational environment has a significant impact on their behavior and academic progress. Therefore, the worldwide usage of innovative problem-based learning (PBL) medical programs requires major changes in their educational environments. Therefore, measuring students’ perceptions of the complex PBL environment has become a critical necessity as a determinant of students’ academic success and as a part of attaining the quality standards of education.

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate students’ perceptions in the preclinical phase of the PBL educational environment in the new Sharjah Medical College, UAE; and to recommend remedial procedures.

Methodology: The English version of the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory was submitted to 250 students in years 1, 2, and 3. The data were analyzed using the SPSS 20 software, and significance was taken at P<0.05. The survey was performed in a mid-semester week.

Findings: 215 students responded to the questionnaire (100% response rate). The overall DREEM score was 113.4/ 200 (56.7%). First-year students expressed higher overall significant level of perception (119.4/ 200) than second-year (107.4/ 200) and third-year (112.7/ 200) students. In addition, first-year students perceived their learning, teaching, and academic climates as more significant than the other two batches. The scores obtained in the five domains were as follows; 28/48 in perception of learning, 26/44 in perception of teaching, 18/32 in academic self-perceptions, 27/48 in perceptions of atmosphere, and 15/28 in social self-perceptions. First-year students achieved the highest score (18.7/32) in the academic self-perception. The total score was significantly higher in female than in male students (115.9 vs. 108.1).

Conclusion: The PBL environment is generally perceived positively by our medical students. Nevertheless, areas such as curriculum overload and inadequate student support still require further fine-tuning and remedial measures